#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Day 20 – A Red Book

Day 20A Red Book:  Medical Apartheid: The Dark History of Medical Experimentation on Black Americans from Colonial Times to the Present

“From the era of slavery to the present day, the first full history of black America’s shocking mistreatment as unwilling and unwitting experimental subjects at the hands of the medical establishment.

Medical Apartheid is the first and only comprehensive history of medical experimentation on African Americans. Starting with the earliest encounters between black Americans and img_2526Western medical researchers and the racist pseudoscience that resulted, it details the ways both slaves and freedmen were used in hospitals for experiments conducted without their knowledge—a tradition that continues today within some black populations. It reveals how blacks have historically been prey to grave-robbing as well as unauthorized autopsies and dissections. Moving into the twentieth century, it shows how the pseudoscience of eugenics and social Darwinism was used to justify experimental exploitation and shoddy medical treatment of blacks, and the view that they were biologically inferior, oversexed, and unfit for adult responsibilities. Shocking new details about the government’s notorious Tuskegee experiment are revealed, as are similar, less-well-known medical atrocities conducted by the government, the armed forces, prisons, and private institutions.
The product of years of prodigious research into medical journals and experimental reports long undisturbed, Medical Apartheid reveals the hidden underbelly of scientific research and makes possible, for the first time, an understanding of the roots of the African American health deficit. At last, it provides the fullest possible context for comprehending the behavioral fallout that has caused black Americans to view researchers—and indeed the whole medical establishment—with such deep distrust. No one concerned with issues of public health and racial justice can afford not to read Medical Apartheid, a masterful book that will stir up both controversy and long-needed debate.” (Medical Apartheid, Goodreads description)

My copy:  Medical Apartheid, paperback 528 pages

Absolutely watch the two videos. They are informative and chilling.  We really have some work to do in the United States concerning race relations and being aware of OUR history!

 

 

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Day 19 – Currently Reading

Day 19Currently Reading

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My copies:

Like Trees, Walking, paperback 252 pages

Blacks, paperback 512 pages

Jubilee, paperback 497 pages

Forgotten: The Untold Story of D-Day’s Black Heroes, at Home and at War, hardcover 368 pages

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 18 An Underrated Book

Day 18An Underrated Book  One of my prize discoveries in literature last year was Daughter by Asha Bandele.  The writing and the message were both beautiful.  I hadn’t heard of this author and hadn’t heard anyone speak of her nor of her novels.  Daughter img_2517was published in 2003, but being read today is very modern and unfortunately deals with problems of today in the United States for African-Americans.  If you haven’t read Daughter, you should definitely take the time to read and savor the writing, where every word counts and none are wasted.

asha bandele is a journalist, author, and poet.  She was a features editor and journalist at Essence magazine.  Her memoir A Prisoner’s Wife depicts her relationship with her husband who was serving a twenty-two year life sentence in prison.  Her second memoir Something Like Beautiful: One Single Mother’s Story explores the outcome of that relationship and the birth of her daughter, Nisa and her struggle after her husband is refused parole and is deported.

“At nineteen, Aya is a promising Black college student from Brooklyn who is struggling through a difficult relationship with her emotionally distant mother, Miriam. One winter asha bandelenight, Aya is shot by a white police officer in a case of mistaken identity. Keeping vigil by her daughter’s hospital bed, Miriam remembers her own youth: her battle for independence from her parents, her affair with Aya’s father, and the challenges of raising her daughter. But as Miriam confronts her past — her losses and regrets — she begins to heal and discovers a tentative hopefulness.”(Daughter, back cover description)

My copy: Daughter, paperback 260 pages

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 17 A Short Story Collection

Day 17A Short Story Collection  –  I’m not usually a fan of short story collections because they always seem to leave me hanging (so that’s it?!) or wanting more.  However, last year put me on the right track with getting back into them.  I read Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self, Blackberries, Blackberries, A Piece of Mine, and Water Street.  All four img_2515collections had me captivated and made me want to explore other short story collections.  So, at the end of last year I picked up Lost in the City by Edward P. Jones which I have heard no one really talk about.  Jones is most known for winning the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for The Known World in 2004.  I didn’t even know he’d written a short story collection.  Actually he’s written two, the second collection is called All Aunt Hagar’s Children.  Hopefully, I’ll make the time to explore Lost in the City this year and it will join the list of short stories that keep me captivated and leave me satisfied. How about you?  Do you like reading short story collections?  If so, what are some of your favorites?

“The nation’s capital that serves as the setting for the stories in Edward P. Jones’s prizewinning collection, Lost in the City, lies far from the city of historic monuments and national politicians. Jones takes the reader beyond that world into the lives of African American men and women who work against the constant threat of loss to maintain a sense of hope. From “The Girl Who Raised Pigeons” to the well-to-do career woman awakened in the night by a phone call that will take her on a journey back to the past, the characters in these stories forge bonds of community as they struggle against the limits of their city to stave off the loss of family, friends, memories, and, ultimately, themselves.

Critically acclaimed upon publication, Lost in the City introduced Jones as an undeniable talent, a writer whose unaffected style is not only evocative and forceful but also filled with insight and poignancy.” (Lost in the City, back cover description)

 

My copy:  Lost in the City, paperback 268 pages

 

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 16 Book You Want to Own

The CotillionDay 16Book You Want to Own  The book I’d love to own is John Oliver Killens’s The Cotillion One Good Bull is Half the Herd.  I’ve always been interested in reading and owning this book, as well as his others Youngblood, And Then We Heard the Thunder, and Sippi.  I’ll have to save up for this one because it’s a little pricey in the old 1970s edition I want with the dust jacket.  One day….

“Beautiful, high-stepping Yoruba of Harlem is invited to the annual cotillion thrown by African American high society of Queens. Caught between the indifference of her father, the excitement of her social-climbing mother, and her prodigal boyfriend’s militancy, Yoruba persuades her sister debutantes to challenge the aging doyennes in one of the most sidesplitting scenes in American literature.john olliver killens

Nominated for a Pulitzer in 1972, Killens’s uproarious satire captures the conflicts within black society in the 1960s. The Cotillion is the fourth title in Coffee House Press’s acclaimed Black Arts Movement series.”(The Cotillion, Goodreads description)

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Day 15 -Book You Hated

Day 15Book You Hated Hands down Billy is my most hated novel.  In my opinion billyeverything with this book was wrong – plot, characters, terrible dialect,etc. I just couldn’t find a thing redeeming about it. How about you?  What’s your most hated book?

“The tale of Billy Lee Turner, a ten-year-old boy convicted of the murder of a white girl in Mississippi in 1937, illuminates the monstrous face of racism in America with harrowing clarity and power. Narrated in the rich accents of the American South, Billy’s story is told amid the picking fields and town streets, the heat, dust and povery of the region in the time of the Depression. Albert French’s haunting first novel is a story of racial injustice, as unsentimental as it is heartbreaking.”(Billy, Description on Amazon)

My copy: Billy, paperback 224 pages

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 14 One True Pairing

Day 14One True Pairing  Osceola and Lizzie from Some Sing, Some Cry were the cutest couple in this novel.  They were the two most well matched too.  Osceola was protective, shy, and intelligent.  Lizzie was extrovert, creative, and brash.  These two could only be complimentary to each other.

“Award-winning writer Ntozake Shange and real-life sister, award-winning playwright Ifa Bayeza achieve nothing less than a modern classic in this epic story of the Mayfield family.img_2498 Opening dramatically at Sweet Tamarind, a rice and cotton plantation on an island off South Carolina’s coast, we watch as recently emancipated Bette Mayfield says her goodbyes before fleeing for the mainland. With her granddaughter, Eudora, in tow, she heads to Charleston. There, they carve out lives for themselves as fortune-teller and seamstress. Dora will marry, the Mayfield line will grow, and we will follow them on an journey through the watershed events of America’s troubled, vibrant history—from Reconstruction to both World Wars, from the Harlem Renaissance to Vietnam and the modern day. Shange and Bayeza give us a monumental story of a family and of America, of songs and why we have to sing them, of home and of heartbreak, of the past and of the future, bright and blazing ahead.”

Some Sing, Some Cry was a joint effort novel written by two sisters, Ntosake Shange and Ifa Bayeza.  The thread of music runs through the novel and develops as the the story of this African-American family develops from Negro spirituals onward, setting the appropriate tone for the time period; while containing real people that define important periods of the entertainment world through the years.  It’s an epic story about a family of women and it will win your heart over.  You’ll care about each character of this family to a certain degree and you won’t want the story to end.  It’s a must read and you’ll definitely learn things!

 

My copy:  Some Sing, Some Cry hardcover, 560 pages

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge – Day 13 Jilted Love

Day 13 – Jilted Love –  I had to go with Loving Donovan! That’s all I’m going to say since I’ll be getting into spoiler territory.

“The first section of this unconventional love story belongs to Campbell. Despite being born to a broken-hearted mother and a faithless father, Campbell still believes in the img_2493power of love…if she can ever find it. Living in the same neighborhood, but unknown to Campbell until a chance meeting brings them together, is Donovan, the “little man” of a shattered home-a family torn apart by anger and bitterness. In the face of these daunting obstacles, Donovan dreams of someday marrying, raising a family, and playing for the NBA. But, deep inside, Campbell and Donovan live with the histories that have shaped their lives. What they discover-together and apart-forms the basis of this compelling, sensual, and surprising novel.

A deeply thoughtful novel about hope, forgiveness, and the cost of Loving Donovan, this is certain to be another bestseller from a supremely gifted author.”(Loving Donovan, back cover)

My copy:  Loving Donovan, paperback 224 pages

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Day 12 – Favorite Fantasy/Sci-fi

Day 12Favorite Fantasy/Sci-fi:  Well the only thing I’ve read that could fit this category is Kindred. However, technically I don’t feel it really fits, even though I enjoyed it. I don’t usually gravitate towards Fantasy/Sci-fi novels.  They just seem to be so complicated that I can’t get into them.  So, I’ve decided to put up Lilith’s Brood (Xenogenesis #1-3)since a little birdie 😉 Danielle @onesmallpaw has been raving about it.  I’ve only heard excellent img_2491things about Butler so I’m going to give Lilith’s Brood a good try this year.  That might be my only real announced reading goal for 2016. 🙂

“Lilith Iyapo is in the Andes, mourning the death of her family, when war destroys Earth. Centuries later, she is resurrected — by miraculously powerful unearthly beings, the Oankali. Driven by an irresistible need to heal others, the Oankali are rescuing our dying planet by merging genetically with mankind. But Lilith and all humanity must now share the world with uncanny, unimaginably alien creatures: their own children. This is their story…”(Lilith’s Brood, back cover)

Octavia E. Butler was born in 1947 and died at the early age of 58 in 2006.  She was an African-American sic-fi/Fantasy writer that received the Nebula and Hugo Awards several octaviabutlertimes.  Kindred and Fledgling are her only two standalone novels, however she is most know for the Patternist series, the Xenogenesis series, and the Parable series which is also referred to as the Earthseed.  She’s also written essays, speeches and two short story collections.  Butler’s speculative fiction held important themes of community, race, hierarchies in society, feminism, and afrofuturism.  She has long been regarded a must for those looking for Fantasy/Sci-fi with challenging twists and non-stereotypical storylines.

My copy:  Lilith’s Brood Xenogenesis #1-3 series, paperback 746 pages

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#ReadSoulLit Photo Challenge Day 11 -Book Over 500 Pages

img_2488Day 11Book Over 500 Pages  I’ve chosen Mosquito by Gayl Jones from the few books I own over 500 pages.  It’s actually 616 pages.  Last year I read Corregidora and loved it’s story, style, and feminist message.  Hoping that Mosquito is just as good….

“Sojourner Nadine Jane Johnson, also known as Mosquito, is an African-American truck driver. Set in a south Texas border town, “Mosquito” is the story of her accidental and yet growing involvement in “the new underground railroad, ” a sanctuary movement for Mexican immigrants. Mosquito’s journey begins when she discovers Maria, a stowaway who nearly gives birth in the back of the truck; Maria will eventually name her baby Journal, a misspelled tribute to her unwitting benefactor Sojourner. Along the road, Mosquito introduces us to Delgadina, a Chicana bartender who fries cactus, writes haunting stories, and studies to become a detective – one of the most original and appealing characters in all of Jones’ fiction. We also meet Monkey Bread, a childhood pal who is, improbably, assistant to a blonde star in Hollywood, where Mosquito pays her a memorable visit. As her understanding of the immigrants’ need to forge new lives and identities deepens, so too does Mosquito’s romance with Ray, a gentle revolutionary, philosopher, and, perhaps, a priest.”(Mosquito, inside flap)

My copy: Mosquito, hardcover 616 pages

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